Correlating Sea Level Rise Still-stands to Marine Terraces and Undiscovered Submerged Shoreline Features in the Channel Islands (USA) Using Autonomous and Remotely Operated Systems

TitleCorrelating Sea Level Rise Still-stands to Marine Terraces and Undiscovered Submerged Shoreline Features in the Channel Islands (USA) Using Autonomous and Remotely Operated Systems
Publication TypeConference Abstract
Year2017
AuthorsRaineault, N, Ballard, R, Fahy, J, Mayer, LA, Heffron, E, Kranosky, K, Roman, C, Schmidt, VE, McLeod, A, Bursek, J, Broad, K
Conference Name2017 Fall Meeting, American Geophysical Union (AGU)
Conference LocationNew Orleans, LA
Conference DatesDecember 11-15
Keywordsasv, backscatter, bathymetry, em302, multibeam, ROV

In 2017, the Ocean Exploration Trust aggregated onboard and autonomous mapping technologies to identify and explore paleo shorelines and discover previously undocumented submerged shoreline features in and around the Channel Islands offshore of California. Broad area mapping was conducted with the hull mounted multibeam echosounder aboard the E/V Nautilus. This Kongsberg EM302 provided maps at 2-10 m resolution, at depths generally greater than 50 m. From this data marine terraces were identified for higher resolution mapping via an Autonomous Surface Vehicle (ASV). The precision data from the ASV’s Kongsberg EM2040p echosounder allowed identification of the knickpoints associated with cliffs on the landward extent of each terrace. Sub-sea cave targets were identified using backscatter and slope maps from a combination of both the broad area and high resolution multibeam data. To ground-truth the targets identified through mapping, remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) and a highly specialized team of cave divers explored these targets. The results from the visual inspection were then fed back into the analysis fostering the rapid iteration of the onboard identification criteria and resulted in locating submerged shorelines containing numerous large caves, arches, and concretions. Caves were found at still-stands at 8, 33, 66, and 103 m depth at Santa Cruz Island, Santa Barbara Island platform, and Osborn Bank, along the vertical escarpment at the cliff-face and aligned with the strike of fractures in the volcanic rock. These terraces correspond to different sea level still-stands. ROV grab samples of fossiliferous marine terraces will provide ages and aid in reconstructions of sea level change and tectonic history for each location. Finally, caves were mapped in sub-cm resolution using a Kongsberg M3 sonar mounted vertically on the front of the ROV to test the capabilities of the system to provide accurate information about exterior dimensions and morphology. 

 

URLhttps://agu.confex.com/agu/fm17/meetingapp.cgi/Paper/292497